National Dog Bite Prevention Week, May 17–23, 2009

Dog Bite Kit cover letter.

I: Stay Alert: Don’t Be Fooled by “My Dog Won’t Bite!”

Stay Alert: Don't be fooled by "My dog won't bite!" National Dog Bite Prevention Week May 17-23, 2009.

Be a responsible pet owner! For everyone's safety, don't allow your dog to roam. National Dog Bite Prevention Week May 17-23, 2009.

II. Fiscal Years 2007 and 2008 Total OSHA-Recordable Dog Attacks and Bites

 

District

Number of Accidents

2007

2008

HOUSTON

103

106

LOS ANGELES

73

97

SIERRA COASTAL

60

96

SANTA ANA

87

94

LOUISIANA

67

82

CENTRAL ILLINOIS

56

77

ARIZONA

44

72

SACRAMENTO

85

69

BAY-VALLEY

69

65

NORTHERN OHIO

57

63

OKLAHOMA

32

62

GREATER INDIANA

51

60

MID-AMERICA

54

60

TRIBORO

59

57

LONG ISLAND

42

57

RIO GRANDE

64

57

DETROIT

49

55

SOUTH FLORIDA

61

54

NORTHLAND

64

53

COLORADO/WYOMING

61

53

SAN DIEGO

51

53

ALBANY

40

52

GATEWAY

62

47

DALLAS

64

47

CINCINNATI

52

46

NORTHERN VIRGINIA

29

43

SUNCOAST

36

42

LAKELAND

49

42

CENTRAL PLAINS

41

42

CONNECTICUT

47

41

CAPITAL

43

41

HAWKEYE

46

41

KENTUCKIANA

48

40

COLUMBUS

37

40

SEATTLE

43

40

BALTIMORE

33

39

NORTHERN ILLINOIS

63

39

FORT WORTH

58

39

PORTLAND

37

39

WESTERN NEW YORK

28

38

PHILADELPHIA

35

38

MID-CAROLINAS

21

38

NORTHERN NEW JERSEY

67

37

TENNESSEE

53

37

WESTCHESTER

26

35

CHICAGO

30

35

SOUTHEAST MICHIGAN

47

34

PITTSBURGH

51

32

CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA

31

32

ALABAMA

36

32

NORTH FLORIDA

29

28

SAN FRANCISCO

32

27

MASSACHUSETTS

42

26

CENTRAL NEW JERSEY

32

26

CARIBBEAN

19

25

SOUTH JERSEY

34

25

RICHMOND

41

24

GREENSBORO

24

23

SOUTH GEORGIA

10

23

CENTRAL FLORIDA

32

22

GREATER MICHIGAN

30

22

ATLANTA

27

21

SPOKANE

18

19

BOSTON

22

18

SOUTHEAST NEW ENGLAND

25

18

ERIE

25

18

APPALACHIAN

19

18

ALBUQUERQUE

13

17

SALT LAKE CITY

19

15

NEVADA-SIERRA

25

14

ARKANSAS

25

12

DAKOTAS

16

11

NEW HAMPSHIRE/VERMONT

11

10

HONOLULU

7

10

NEW YORK

11

9

GREATER SOUTH CAROLINA

11

8

MISSISSIPPI

10

7

BIG SKY

7

6

MAINE

9

4

ALASKA

1

4

Total dog bite attacks and bites

3,168

3,000

Source: PS Form 1769/EDW/MSTR

III. Build Community Awareness Through Media Attention (Television, Radio, and Print)

n Building Community Awareness through Media Attention.

n Public Service Announcements — Dog Bite Preven­tion Week.

n An Employee Event the Media Will Love.

n Media Advisory.

n News Release — A Different Kind of Chorus.

n Postmaster Newspaper Column No 1.

n Postmaster Newspaper Column No 2.

n Postmaster Newspaper Column No 3.

For information regarding the above media outreach opportunities, visit http://safetytoolkit.usps.gov/Resources.

This URL will also provide tips on promoting and plan­ning employee events that the media will love.

Dog Bite Prevention Background and Tips

The Victims

n More than 4.5 million people attacked annually.

n Children are the majority of victims and are 900 times more likely to be bitten than letter carriers.

n The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) report that small children, the elderly, and letter carriers, in that order, are the most frequent victims. Dog attacks are the most commonly reported child­hood public health problem in the United States.

n The AVMA also reports that the number of dog attacks exceeds the reported instances of measles, whooping cough, and mumps, combined. Dog bite victims account for up to 5 percent of emergency room visits.

n Many of the OSHA-recordable bites that were reported by letter carriers in 2008 came from dogs whose owners used those famous last words “my dog won’t bite.”

n According to the AVMA, as many as 800,000 people annually are admitted to U.S. emergency depart­ments with dog bite–associated injuries, and count­less more bites go unreported and untreated.

How to Avoid Being Bitten

n Don’t run past a dog. The dog’s natural instinct is to chase and catch prey.

n If a dog threatens you, don’t scream. Avoid eye con­tact. Try to remain motionless until the dog leaves, and then back away slowly until the dog is out of sight.

n Don’t approach a strange dog, especially one that’s tethered or confined.

n While letter carriers are discouraged from petting ani­mals, people who choose to pet dogs should always let a dog see and sniff them before petting the animal.

n If you believe a dog is about to attack you, try to place something between yourself and the dog, such as a backpack or a bicycle.

How to Be a Responsible Dog Owner

n Obedience training can teach dogs proper behavior and help owners control their dog in any situation.

n When the letter carrier comes to your home, keep your dog inside, away from the door, in another room, or on a leash.

n Don’t let your child take mail from the letter carrier in the presence of your dog. Your dog’s instinct is to protect the family.

n Spay or neuter your dog. Neutered dogs are less likely to bite. Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) statistics reflect that dogs that have not been spayed or neutered are up to three times more likely to be involved in a biting incident than neutered or spayed dogs.

n Dogs that haven’t been properly socialized, receive little attention or handling, or are left tied up for long periods of time frequently turn into biters.

United States Postal Service Postal News logo.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: [Insert your name]

[Insert Date] [Insert your phone number]

Internet: www.usps.com

Public Service Announcement
May 1723 is National Dog Bite Prevention Week

Below you will find three public service announcements (PSAs) for your consideration. Spring is here, more people and dogs will be on the street, and this is the perfect time to participate in an education campaign aimed at reducing these painful and costly attacks.

For decades, the U.S. Postal Service® has taken a leadership role in preventing animal attacks because letter carriers are the third most likely group to be bitten by a dog. Children and the elderly rank number one and two, respectively. More information is found on the Dog Bite Prevention Background and Tips sheet attached. [Attach Dog Bite Prevention Background and Tips sheet.]

Please join the Postal Service™ in this important public education campaign by using these public service announcements and by interviewing Postal Service, animal protection, and public health officials during National Dog Bite Prevention Week.

PSA 1

It’s that time of year again, and the Postal Service, health care providers, and animal protection professionals need your help. Last year, nationwide, 3,000 letter carriers sustained OSHA-recordable dog bite injuries. But that pales in comparison to the more than 4.5 million people — most of them children and the elderly — who are bitten by dogs each year. You can help protect your letter carrier, meter reader, newspaper delivery person, or neighbors’ children by making sure your pet is properly restrained. Be a responsible pet owner. Help prevent the injuries and deaths caused by animal attacks. This message is a public service of this station and your local Post Office™.

PSA 2

At this point in our nation’s history, even the comedians know that “dog bites man” is no laughing matter. That’s why the nation’s letter carriers, who suffered more than 3,000 dog bite injuries last year, are reminding pet owners to restrain their dogs to protect letter carriers, meter readers, children, and others who may come near their dogs. This message is a public service of this station and your local Post Office.

PSA 3

Pet owners, did you know that if your dog attacks a letter carrier, you could be held liable for all medical expenses and other costs, which can run into thousands of dollars? Don’t think your fence is the only protection you need — especially if a letter carrier or delivery person must enter your yard. The Postal Service is not anti-dog, but pro-responsibility. Responsible pet ownership includes making sure your pet is properly restrained. Last year, 3,000 letter carriers sustained OSHA-recordable dog bites while delivering the mail. Help your letter carrier deliver safely for you. This message is a public service of this station and your local Post Office.

# # # 

IV. Community Involvement

Most people think children and dogs go together natu­rally, and they often do, but it may shock you to learn that children are the most common victims of dog bites. You can use the following talk and the enclosed handout to alert schoolchildren to two important points in preventing dog bites: Responsible pet ownership and safe behavior around dogs.

Sponsoring a poster contest gets children involved in spreading the word about preventing dog bites. Colorful posters that result from the contest are a great way to get the word out to the public.

Due to budget constraints, a 2009 dog bite prevention poster was not printed. Postmasters should e-mail mark.r.saunders@usps.gov to obtain a link to the high-resolution image for local printing.

Get postmasters and station managers to hang posters or to display them on bulletin boards or at local high-traffic grocery stores.

The postmaster is one of the key leaders in each community. Postmasters should use their influence to win support from other key leaders for our campaign to reduce dog attacks and dog bites. The suggestions in this section will get you started toward some cooperative campaigning for dog bite awareness.

Sample Postmaster Columns

Using the following sample postmaster columns will help you spread the word about the Postal Service’s efforts to protect letter carriers and children in the community. The message is that dog bites are a serious matter, and by helping protect letter carriers, the public is protecting everyone.

Place these columns on your letterhead and take or send them to your local newspapers. It’s a good idea to localize the articles with experiences from your own Post Office or community. Contact local newspaper editors to propose running the column weekly for 3 weeks. You should also post copies of these columns on your informa­tion boards.

Although the material is designed specifically for use during the spring, you also can use it to build community awareness throughout the summer months.

Postmaster Column No. 1

“Children Suffer Most Dog Bites,” By [Name], Postmaster [City]

For every letter carrier bitten, hundreds of children needlessly suffer the pain and trauma of dog bites. What­ever the reasons, dog bites are a serious problem for the entire community, and not just our letter carriers. Three thousand dog bites last year. That’s an average of 11 dog attacks every delivery day, and that figure does not include the number of threatening incidents that did not result in injury. These numbers pale in comparison with the more than 4.7 million people — mostly children and the elderly — who suffer injuries from dog attacks each year.

In [City] last year, dogs bit [number] letter carriers and interfered with a significant number of mail deliveries [or you can estimate a number if possible]. Fortunately, most dog bites can be prevented through responsible pet ownership.

[If you did have dog bites last year, use the previous paragraph and insert a paragraph or two here giving a few details, such as the seriousness of the incidents and the amount of lost time. If you had no dog bites or no cases of dogs interfering with mail delivery last year, omit the previous paragraph.]

If a letter carrier needs to deliver a certified letter or a package to you, put your dog into a separate room before opening your front door. Dogs have been known to burst through screen doors or plate-glass windows to get at strangers.

[Insert a letter carrier story here, if applicable.]

Nationally, the number of carriers bitten by dogs has declined over the years. This is because of greater cooper­ation from dog owners, stricter leash laws, and stepped-up efforts to educate letter carriers and the public about deal­ing with the problem.

Our letter carriers are vigilant and dedicated, but we may be forced to stop mail delivery at an address if a letter carrier is threatened by a vicious dog. In some instances, Postal Service employees have sued and collected dam­ages for dog bite injuries. We can’t control people’s dogs; only dog owners can do that.

While some attribute attacks on letter carriers to dogs’ inbred aversion to uniforms, experts say the psychology actually runs much deeper. Every day that a letter carrier comes into a dog’s territory, the dog barks and the letter carrier leaves. Day after day the dog sees this action repeated. After a week or two, the dog appears to feel invincible against intruders. Once the dog gets loose, there’s a good chance it will attack.

Dog owners should remind their children about the need to keep the family dog secured. We also recommend parents ask their children not to take mail directly from letter carriers. A dog may see handing mail to a child as a threatening gesture.

These simple reminders and helpful tips can reduce the hazard of dog bite attacks. Help us to help you this spring and summer.

This is the first in a series of three columns by [City] Postmaster [Name] addressing the problem of dog attacks, both in the Postal Service and in the community. Next week: “Why Do Some Dogs Bite?

# # # 

Postmaster Column No. 2

“Why Do Some Dogs Bite?” By [Name], Postmaster [City]

Would your dog bite? The American Veterinary Medical Association estimates that more than 4.7 million dog bites are reported to local authorities each year. Countless more go unreported.

Dog bites can range from a relatively painless nip to a fatal mauling. Dog bite victims account for up to 5 percent of all hospital emergency room visits. Children are most often the victims. Dog attacks are the most commonly reported childhood public health problem in the United States.

You may feel confident that your dog won’t add to these statistics, and it is probably true that your trusty companion will never seriously harm anyone. However, if your dog does attack or bite someone, you could be liable for the victim’s pain, suffering, and medical expenses. Potential victims include your letter/rural carrier and neighborhood children. There are several ways you can avoid liability. Reducing the likelihood your dog will ever bite someone helps protect you, your canine companion, and everyone else in the community.

Why Do Some Dogs Bite?

Lack of socialization, improper training, excitement, and fear can all contribute to a dog attack. Even a nip on the leg is unacceptable behavior for a family dog.

Although dogs may bite for a variety of reasons, spaying or neutering has been shown to reduce aggressiveness. Bite statistics show that dogs that have not been spayed or neutered are up to three times more likely to be involved in a biting incident.

Three Suggestions to Help Take the Bite Out of Your Dog:

n Teach your dog appropriate behavior. Don’t play aggressive games with your dog such as wrestling, tug of war, or siccing your dog on another person. It’s essential that your dog recognize members of your family as dominant figures not to be challenged.

n Be a responsible pet owner. For everyone’s safety, don’t allow your dog to roam. Make your pet a mem­ber of your family. Dogs that spend too much time tethered to a dog house or in the back yard have a much greater chance of developing aggressive behavioral problems.

n Stay on the safe side. Help your dog become accus­tomed to a variety of situations. If you don’t know how your dog will react to a new situation, be cau­tious. If you think your dog could panic in a crowd, leave him or her at home. If your dog may overreact to visitors or delivery people, keep him or her in another room.

This is the second in a series of three columns by [City] Postmaster [Name] addressing the problem of dog attacks, both in the Postal Service and in the community. Next week: “Protecting the Community.”

# # # 

Postmaster Column No. 3

“Protecting the Community,” By [Name], Postmaster [City]

Last year, dog bites resulted in 3,000 OSHA-recordable injuries to carriers nationwide. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that nearly 2 percent of the American population is bitten by a dog each year, and most of the victims are children.

The most recent statistics from the 2007 U.S. Pet Ownership and Demographic Sourcebook states that there are 72,114,000 dogs in the United States; 43,021,000 households own dogs in the U.S., and that equates to 37.2 percent of households.

Clearly, parents must never leave a defenseless infant with a dog and must make sure that older children know the potential danger of dog bites. It is also important to know that studies have shown that dogs are three times more likely to be involved in a biting incident if they have not been spayed or neutered.

To learn more about the importance of neutering or spaying your pets, visit the American Partnership for Pets (APP), an unprecedented coalition of more than 25 leading and influential animal health and welfare organizations, community animal care and control services, and veterinar­ians at www.americanpartnershipforpets.org.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) has found that the breed of animal most commonly involved in dog attacks can change from year to year and from one part of the country to another, depending on the popularity of the breed. According to the HSUS, while some breeds are more likely to bite, other factors like whether the animal has been spayed or neutered, and whether the animal has been properly socialized, safely confined, properly super­vised, and humanely trained play great roles in a dog’s tendency to bite. Dog owners can prevent serious injuries to others by realizing their important role in dog bite prevention.

This concludes a series of three columns by [City] Post­master [Name] addressing the problem of dog attacks, both in the Postal Service and in the community.

# # # 

Postmaster Speech

Dog Bite Prevention Speech for School Children

[Make the presentation light and fun. Even though this is a serious subject, children will respond to your being friendly and approachable. Be sure to tell the children what a postmaster is/does.]

Good morning boys and girls.

My name is [Name] and I’m your postmaster.

[Tell the children what a postmaster is/does.]

How many of you have dogs at home or have friends who own a dog? [Listen to responses.] Have you or any of your friends ever been bitten by a dog? [Listen to responses, and if so, add comment: “Well, I’ll bet you didn’t like it, did you?”]

At the Post Office where I work, the people who deliver your mail get bitten, too. Sometimes they have to go to the hospital and can’t do their job for a long time. The dog’s owner may have to pay a big hospital bill, and the mail may not be delivered to that house until the owners promise to keep the dog fenced in.

I don’t want anybody at work to be bitten, and I don’t want any of you to get bitten, either. That’s why I’m here today, because I need your help.

First, I want all of you to be safe. Do you know how many people get bitten by dogs every year? [Children guess.] I heard some good guesses. The correct answer is 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs each year and guess what? The number one victim is children. That means you! More than 2 million children were bitten — and that’s not good.

Who did the biting? In fact, the bites usually come from the family pet or from a dog owned by a nearby neighbor. Can you believe it?

There are several things you can do to help out. Be nice to your dog and to all dogs. Don’t tease them. Don’t play too rough with them. Instead, teach your dog good man­ners. A trained dog is a happy dog. Remember to give dogs space when they are eating, sleeping, tired, sick, or caring for puppies. Remember: Dogs get cranky just like people, and they may bite if they are suddenly surprised or hurt. If you see a dog running loose in your neighborhood, tell your parents. Never, ever approach a strange dog.

You can also help your letter carrier, because thousands of letter carriers get bitten every year, too. The most impor­tant thing is to stop your dog from getting outside and running loose. When you go outside, make sure to close the door tight, and when you are playing with your dog in the yard, make sure you close the gate so he does not get out.

When you see the letter carrier coming down your street, look around and make sure your dog is either inside or securely fenced away from the mailbox.

When the letter carrier gets to your house, let him or her put the mail in your mailbox. Never reach out to take the mail yourself, because your dog might think the letter car­rier is a threat to you even though we know that isn’t true.

After the letter carrier has delivered the mail and gone, you still need to watch out for loose dogs. Never step too close to a strange dog. Even if he looks friendly, he might still bite.

I am going to give each of you a list of things you can do to help keep dogs from biting your letter carrier, your friends, and yourself. I want you to take this list home and talk to your parents about it. See if they will help you keep your dog from getting outside.

If you do that, your letter carrier won’t have to worry about going to the hospital for a dog bite, and we can ensure that everyone’s mail is safely and quickly delivered.

Most importantly, we want you to be safe. So please remember to take care of your dog and use good safety habits even around dogs you know. Don’t be one of those 2 million children who experience the pain of a dog bite.

Thank you.

V. Information for All Employees

Service Talk

Dog Bite Prevention Tips for Mail Carriers and Children — How You Can Help Prevent Dog Bites

To help make your neighborhood safe for the carrier, yourself, and other people, just remember these simple rules:

1. Find out what time the carrier usually brings your mail.

2. When the carrier is due to visit your house, check to be sure your dog is inside. Keep the dog inside until the letter carrier is gone.

3. If someone needs to open the door to sign for a letter, first put the dog in another room and close the door.

4. If you have a mail slot, keep your dog away from the slot so the carrier’s fingers don’t get bitten.

5. If your mailbox is inside your fenced yard, and your dog is too, keep the dog on a leash away from the mailbox during the time your letter carrier delivers the mail.

6. When your dog is outside, never walk up to the letter carrier and ask for your mail. Your dog may think you are being threatened.

7. If you see a dog running loose in your neighborhood, tell your parents or report it to the proper authorities.

8. Never, ever approach a strange dog. Remember: no owner, no petting. Only approach a dog that is on a leash with his owner, and follow the steps of WAIT, as described here.

9. When a strange dog comes near you, be BORING! Stand like a tree, or if you are on the ground, curl up your legs, cup your hands over your ears and lay still like a rock!

10. Don’t go near a dog that is in a car, behind a fence, or tied up — even if you know him.

Below is a story from a young girl who shares her expe­rience with others:

Kely Voigt of Palatine, Illinois, tells it better than anyone. In 1999, Kelly, then seven, was bitten by a neighborhood dog. The attack left Kelly with approximately 100 stitches in her face and a fear of being outdoors. This brutal attack caused so much pain and suffering that a few months later she was treated by a psychologist for post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.

This young girl gained national attention after taking advice from her psychologist to use her experience to help others. Kelly started a nonprofit organization called Prevent the Bite with her mother, Kathy, and Nancy Skeffington, a school psychologist and animal-assisted therapist, and is using her experience to educate other children and adults on how to avoid such brutal attacks.

Part of their program includes the acronym WAIT, which is used to pet a dog on a leash with his owner. WAIT stands for:

W – Wait to see if the dog looks friendly. If the dog looks afraid or angry, STOP and walk away slowly.

A – Ask the owner for permission to pet the dog. If the owner says no, STOP and walk away slowly.

I – Invite the dog to come to you to sniff you. Put your hand to your side with your fingers curled in. Stand slightly sideways and dip your head down so you are not looking directly at the dog. If the dog does not come over to sniff you, STOP and do not touch him.

T – Touch the dog gently to pet, and do so away from the head and tail.

The diagram below includes Kelly’s message and safety tips. For additional information on Prevent the Bite and efforts to help others, visit www.preventthebite.org.

Wait - Wait Ask Invite Touch. www.preventthebite.org.

VI. For Postal Managers

Progressive Warning Letters and Thank You Letter

This section offers materials for you to use to help your letter carriers do their jobs more safely. You can use the progressive warning letters to alert dog owners to the pos­sible loss of mail delivery if they do not restrain their pets. Additionally, don’t forget to send a letter of thanks when they do!

Warning letters, like collection letters, need to be han­dled tactfully. The first and second sample letters on the website tell customers what we want them to do. The third tells them we have taken corrective steps. The fourth and fifth letters detail the customers’ options. In using these let­ters, keep in mind that our purpose is not to police the neighborhood but to obtain a safe environment in which carriers can do their work. Though most customers will respond to your first polite request, be meticulous in follow­ing up if they don’t. Otherwise, your efforts will not be taken seriously.

Samples of these letters can be found on the website at http://safetytoolkit.usps.gov/Resources:

n In the left sidebar, click Safety Programs.

n In the right sidebar, under “Safety Programs Resources,” click Accident Reduction Center.

n On the Accident Reduction Center page, click ARC Dog Bite Prevention and Awareness Publicity Information.

n Under “Resources for Postmasters,” under “Working with the Community,” select the appropriate letter.

Nondelivery of Mail Policy

The availability and use of the repellent does not replace the policy of nondelivery of mail where there is animal interference!

Collection and delivery service personnel are to report the name and address of the customer where such interfer­ence occurs to the postmaster or authorized supervisor who must immediately telephone the customer and request that the animal be confined during the usual deliv­ery hours in the neighborhood. The postmaster or autho­rized supervisor must further inform the customer that (1) no deliveries will be made until this is done, and (2) service will be restored upon assurance that the animal will be con­fined.

Dog Owner’s Responsibility

It is the dog owner’s responsibility to control the dog. Most communities have ordinances for the control of dogs. In spite of the fact that postmasters have frequently requested customers to control their dogs, and have dis­continued service to control this problem, injuries still continue.

VII. Additional Resources

Now that you have read through this publicity kit and made some decisions about what would work best in your area, it is time for action.

In addition to this kit and materials available online, a number of resources are available to assist you in your effort to educate employees, your customers, and the entire community about the importance of dog bite preven­tion. If you have media or public relations questions, area Public Affairs and Communications managers can put you in touch with your local communications person. While the Humane Society of America is not an official partner during this year’s National Dog Bite Prevention Week campaign, it is always willing to help organizations that are promoting safety around animals. Their dog bite prevention website, www.nodogbites.org, is an excellent resource for employ­ees and your community.

Dog bites are no laughing matter! We must take action now to reduce these costly and painful injuries. Remember to stay alert! Don’t be fooled by, “My dog won’t bite!”

Area Corporate Communications Managers

Deborah Yackley
Manager, Corporate Communications
Capital Metro U.S. Postal Service
16501 Shady Grove
Gaithersburg, MD 20898-9998

Telephone: 301-548-1465

Paul Smith
Manager, Corporate Communications
Eastern Area U.S. Postal Service
PO Box 40593
Philadelphia, PA 19197-0593

Telephone: 215-931-5054

Jim Mruk
Manager, Corporate Communications
Great Lakes Area U.S. Postal Service
244 Knollwood Dr., 4th Flr.
Bloomingdale, IL 60117-2208

Telephone: 630-539-6565

Monica Hand
Manager, Corporate Communications
NY Metro Area U.S. Postal Service
90 Church St., Ste. 3600
New York, NY 10007-4699

Telephone: 212-330-5139

Debra Hawkins
Manager, Corporate Communications
Northeast Area U.S. Postal Service
6 Griffin Rd., N
Windsor, CT 06006-9876

Telephone: 860-285-7265

Larry Dingman
Manager, Corporate Communications
Southeast Area U.S. Postal Service
225 N. Humphrey Blvd.
Memphis, TN 38166-0832

Telephone: 901-747-7544

Earl Artis
Manager, Corporate Communications
Southwest Area U.S. Postal Service
7800 N. Stemmons Fwy., Ste. 450
Dallas, TX 75247-4220

Telephone: 214-819-8704

Don Smeraldi
Manager, Corporate Communications
Pacific Area U.S. Postal Service
7001 S. Central Ave., Rm. 364A
Los Angeles, CA 90052-9641

Telephone: 818-674-3149

Teresa Rudkin
Manager, Corporate Communications
Western Area U.S. Postal Service
1745 Stout St., Ste. 400
Denver, CO 80299-7500

Telephone: 303-313-5130

Partnering Organizations

The following is a list of contacts. These organizations can help you obtain local support and find animal behavior experts for local events.

Sharon Curtis Granskog
American Veterinary Medical Association Headquarters
1931 N. Meacham Rd., Ste. 100
Schaumburg, IL 60173

Telephone: 847-925-8070 ext. 6619

Fax: 847-925-1329

e-mail: sharoncurtisgranskog@avma.com

e-mail: avmainfo@avma.org

www.avma.org

Adam Goldfarb
Issues Specialist
Humane Society of the United States
2100 L St., NW
Washington, DC 20037-1598

Telephone: 301-258-3065

Fax: 301-258-3081

e-mail: agoldfarb@hsus.org

www.hsus.org

Gina Steiner
Director Division of Public Information
American Academy of Pediatrics
141 N.W. Point Blvd.
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007

Telephone: 847-434-7945

Fax: 847-434-8000

e-mail: gsteiner@aap.org

www.aap.org

Kathy Voight
Prevent the Bite Organization
PO Box 2101
Palatine, IL 60078-2101

Telephone: 847-322-4179

e-mail: kathyvoigt@sbcglobal.net

www.preventthebite.org

Additional Partner Contacts and Addresses

Lasandra Cooper
Sr. Media Relations Associate
American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS)
American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons (ASMS)
444 E. Algonquin Road
Arlington Heights, IL 60005

Telephone: 847-228-9900

Fax: 847-709-7513

e-mail: media@plasticsurgery.org

www.plasticsurgery.org

Lasandra Cooper
ASPS Sr. Media Relations Associate
American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery (ASRM)
20 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 700
Chicago, IL 60602

Telephone: 847-228-9900

Fax: 847-700-7513

e-mail: media@plasticsurgery.org

www.microsurg.org

Government Relations Representatives

Your Government Relations representatives are here to serve you. They can assist you in contacting and inviting elected officials to participate in your event — please let them know.

Alphabetical State/Representative Listing

Area code and prefix for all extensions is 202-268-XXXX

 

State

Government Relations Representative

Phone Number

Alabama

Laurie Solnik

3743

Alaska

Linda Macasa

3750

Amer Samoa

Linda Macasa

3750

Arizona

Mico Milanovic

7217

Arkansas

Polly Gibbs

4387

California

Linda Macasa

3750

Connecticut

Jo Waterman

6748

Colorado

Mico Milanovic

7217

Delaware

Jo Waterman

6748

DC

Jim Cari

6029

Florida

Laurie Solnik

3743

Georgia

Sandra Calos

8657

Guam

Linda Macasa

3750

Hawaii

Linda Macasa

3750

Idaho

Linda Macasa

3750

Illinois

Talaya Simpson

7839

Indiana

Sheryl Bonifer

7505

Iowa

Sheryl Bonifer

7505

Kansas

Mico Milanovic

7217

Kentucky

Laurie Solnik

3743

Louisiana

Polly Gibbs

4387

Maine

Kathy Sitterle

6027

Maryland

Jim Cari

6029

Massachusetts

Jo Waterman

6748

Michigan

Talaya Simpson

7839

Minnesota

Sheryl Bonifer

7505

Mississippi

Laurie Solnik

3743

Missouri

Sheryl Bonifer

7505

Montana

Linda Macasa

3750

Nebraska

Mico Milanovic

7217

Nevada

Linda Macasa

3750

New Hampshire

Jo Waterman

6748

New Jersey

Jo Waterman

6748

New Mexico

Mico Milanovic

7217

New York

Kathy Sitterle

6027

North Carolina

Sandra Calos

8657

North Dakota

Sheryl Bonifer

7505

Ohio

Jim Cari

6029

Oklahoma

Polly Gibbs

4387

Oregon

Linda Macasa

3750

Pennsylvania

Laurie Solnik

3743

Puerto Rico

Kathy Sitterle

6027

Rhode Island

Jo Waterman

6748

South Carolina

Sandra Calos

8657

South Dakota

Sheryl Bonifer

7505

Tennessee

Sandra Calos

8657

Texas

Polly Gibbs

4387

Utah

Mico Milanovic

7217

Vermont

Kathy Sitterle

6027

Virgin Islands

Kathy Sitterle

6027

Virginia

Jim Cari

6029

Washington

Linda Macasa

3750

West Virginia

Jim Cari

6029

Wisconsin

Talaya Simpson

7839

Wyoming

Mico Milanovic

7217

More Resources

n PS Form 1778, Dog Warning Card
http://blue.usps.gov/formmgmt/forms/ps1778.pdf

n Publication 129, Safety Talks
http://blue.usps.gov/cpim/ftp/pubs/pub129.pdf

n Safety film, Dogs, They Come in All Sizes.
Contact your manager, training (district) for availability.

n Publication 174, How to Avoid Dogs Bites; Dogs and Dog Repellent
http://blue.usps.gov/cpim/ftp/pubs/pub174.pdf

n Dog training video, Understanding Canine Behavior.
Contact your manager, training (district) for availability.

For more information, see the Dog Bite Prevention and Publicity website at http://safetytoolkit.usps.gov/Resources.

n In the left sidebar, click Safety Programs.

n In the right sidebar, under “Safety Programs Resources,” click Accident Reduction Center.

n On the Accident Reduction Center page, click ARC Dog Bite Prevention and Awareness Publicity Information.

The following is a list of all the files you can find there:

Safety Information for Carriers

n General Safety Tips.

n JSA — Confronting a Dog Attack.

n Stay Alert — Don’t be Fooled by My Dog Won't Bite.

n MSDS for Back-Off Dog Repellent 2.7.08.

n Using Dog Repellent — Questions and Answers.

Safety Tips for the Public

n Safety Tips for Parents.

n Dog Bite Prevention Tips for Children.

Resources for Postmasters

n Safety Talks.

n Dog Awareness.

n Proper Use of Dog Repellent Spray.

n Be Safe Around Dogs.

n True or False Quiz: Are You an Unwary Visitor?

n Working with the Community.

n Working with Community Leaders.

n Getting Community Involvement.

n Sample Customer Thank You Letter.

n Sample Warning Letter No 1.

n Sample Warning Letter No 2.

n Sample Warning Letter No 3.

n Sample Warning Letter No 4.

n Postmaster Speech — Dog Bite Prevention for School Children.

n Poster Contest for School Children.

n Working with the Media.

n Building Community Awareness through Media Attention.

n Public Service Announcements — Dog Bite Prevention Week.

n An Employee Event the Media Will Love.

n Media Advisory.

n News Release — A Different Kind of Chorus.

n Postmaster Newspaper Column No 1.

n Postmaster Newspaper Column No 2.

n Postmaster Newspaper Column No 3.

Additional Resources

n Additional Resources — Dog Bite Prevention.

 




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